RE/MAX Advantage I



Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 3/20/2019

There are lots of grills in the market, different in every way, with options, add-ons that might even confuse you, leaving you wondering what you want. There are many kinds of grills to buy and how to get the best grill for you.

  1. Is It Coming Assembled? Check to know how much assembly you may need to do. It might seem like a no-big-deal on the surface, but when you indulge in such an activity, you get to understand how technical and exhausting putting together a grill can be. Do you have the time? Do you have the expertise and tools? To be on a safer side, look at the product and its description or better yet, ask a sales associate to prevent surprises.
  2. Does It Have Any Warranty? If your grill develops a fault after you've bought it due to no error of yours, what are your options? Most manufacturers have a standard warranty that doesn't span beyond a year. To have peace of mind, get one that has an extensive warranty. Mistakes most buyers make is to carry a product home, not minding whether it has a warranty or not. In the end, they end up regretful.
  3. How Much Cooking Power? Here is another factor to consider when buying a grill. Will you be using it once a week? Five times a week throughout the year? Will you be grilling every single day? If you entertain many guests all at once, then output should be put into consideration. The more BTUs that a grill’s burner has, the more heat it produces, and the faster you get things done.
  4. What About Mobility? If you need to move your grill often, you need to get the best grill that’s up for the job. Get a heavy-duty wheel with lockable casters; they can dabble into potholes and still come out fine. Don't go for those grills that come with weak wheels. A broken wheel makes it hard to move your unit around. 
  5. Materials Used in Manufacturing. Materials used in the manufacturing of a grill gives you an idea about its durability. If you want a grilling product that will last for a decade, maybe even more, then consider getting the stainless steel grill. It is better due to its ability to withstand the harsh elements or environment. If you want one that will serve you for two years or maybe more, the iron cast grill might be what you need. 

The above are the significant things to consider when buying a grill. There are other factors to consider as well, like the cost, ease of cleaning, comfort, parts, etc. if you’re yet to order for a grill, go and do it now! Speak to a sales representative at the hardware store also for more information.





Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 3/13/2019

The word “sincere” comes from the Latin prefix sine meaning “without” and the cerae meaning “wax.” In ancient times, when marble had cracks or chips, nefarious craftsmen would fill the crack with wax to hide the damage, making the stonework “insincere.”

With the proliferation of marble countertops in the décor of the past several years, many homeowners do not realize that marble is prone to scratches and other damage. Since marble is rather expensive to replace, knowing how to cover or rid yourself of a minor scratch is imperative. 

Cleaning marble

First, remove all dirt and grime from the surface. Use a gentle cleaner or soapy water, or a marble-specific cleaner and a soft cloth. Do not use harsh or caustic chemicals. Even so-called natural cleaners often contain acid products such as citric juices and can etch the surface. You’ll want to use a neutral pH product.

Preparing surfaces

Don rubber gloves and safety goggles. Using very fine steel wool, gently rub the scratched area to smooth out the edges of your scratch. Be very careful not to rub too deeply. Lightly etch the area around the damage. Then, clean the area again to remove any metal filings.

Apply marble polish to a soft cloth and carefully rub it into the scratch and over all the etched surface. Buff it gently onto the surface. An electric hand buffer works well for larger sections, but be sure to use a very soft attachment on the buffer.

Review the damaged surface to determine if the sheen matches the marble around it. If not, complete the polishing and buffing two to three more times until it reaches your preferred level.

Carefully wash the area with distilled water so as not to allow hard-water deposits to mar the stone further. Pat the area dry with a cotton or microfiber towel and let it dry completely.

Deeper scratches, chips, and other surface imperfections necessitate heavy-duty grinding, honing, and polishing equipment and specialized compounds. Sometimes, specific damage needs diamond grit polishing to replenish the factory finish to your countertop. Extremely worn or damaged marble countertops require the efforts of a professional stone restorer.

If you’re considering replacing your countertops and kitchen surfaces with marble, consult a professional marble cutter and installer to achieve exceptional results.




Tags: how to   kitchen counter   repairs  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 3/6/2019

When your family is searching for a home, it’s an exciting time for the adults, but if there are children involved, it can be a difficult task. Children don’t have to be left in the dark during a home search. Children of all ages can be involved in the process of finding a home. Read on for tips on how to make your kids feel a part of the home search process. 


Young Children


Preschool-aged children might seem not to be aware of the fact that your family is searching for a home, but they can still very much be a part of the process. One thing to remember about young children is that you shouldn’t give them too many options. Once you have narrowed down the homes to a few and the time to buy a home is close, it’s a good time to tell your toddler about the fact that you’re moving. While you probably don’t want to take your kids along with you on all of your home viewings, you can bring the children with you. Even the opinions of the tiniest among us can help contribute to a final decision. 


School-Aged Children


Older children may be more challenging to deal with during a move. These kids are more aware of the changes to come and maybe more reluctant of the entire process. It’s best to include children this age (around 6-9 years old) in conversions about your plans. Where do you hope to move? What neighborhood will the home be? Show them pictures of potential new homes. Allowing kids this age to share their thoughts on location and the types of houses you’re looking at can help to ease fears and anxieties. Remind your kids that the final choice is up to the adults but that you appreciate and welcome their input. 


Older Children And Teenagers 


Pre-teens and teenagers can play a part in the house search. Make sure that they understand that there’s no pressure on them to pick a house but their input is essential to you. Teens are tweens should be encouraged to come along on house tours to help give an opinion on the properties in person. 


The older the kids that are involved, the more you should value and welcome your input.  Make sure that you reassure your teens, letting them know that they can continue their favorite activities. Do a little research on the new community first, or allow your kids to do a bit of research themselves.                     





Tags: Buying a home   children  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 2/27/2019

When you plan to stay in your new home for years to come, you can buy just for yourself and ignore things that would otherwise make reselling the property difficult. However, if you know this home will be back on the market in a few years, you need to check different boxes on that list. Do you know you'll have to move on a tight schedule for work? That makes minding the view even more important.

A Room with a View (that you hate)

Not all homesites have the future view in mind and even those that do risk ruin by city planners adding new infrastructure to your area or new businesses opening. Here's what to avoid:

  • Railroad Tracks: Number one on many buyers "do not want" list, railroad tracks can be a huge barrier to a quick sale. Any train tracks with noisy, consistent business can be irritating to home buyers and reduce the draw for your home. If the property is walking distance from a local station with city access, however, use the local public transportation as a selling point to bring in new potential buyers. 
  • Water Towers and Wind Turbines: Unavoidable in most areas, especially those headed for greener energy or where water is scarce, the goal here is merely to avoid direct window views. If you notice one of these tall local structures blocking the homes' views, finding the house with a different perspective could be the key to your super-fast sale.
  • Power Lines: Electrical lines distract from the view similarly to wind turbines. However, there's a more sinister problem here. Many people believe that power lines emit a kind of radiation that causes health problems. Even though the American Cancer Society says that power lines emit only ELF (extremely low frequency) radiation which shouldn't cause health problems, just the belief in society can drag out your sale timeline or lower the price. 
  • Shops and Restaurants: The goal here is to be careful what businesses are nearby. Visit the property at different times of day to determine how much noise is generated by the nearby restaurants and what kinds of lights or signs might impact your view and living situation. Imposing privacy walls between your home and local businesses don't necessarily help since that can ruin the entire view without actually blocking the noise.

When you're looking at homes to purchase, make sure you check them out at a variety of times of the day. When possible, check the view from every window, both in the dark and during the day. Also, make sure you review the location on weekdays and weekends alike since the activity level of neighborhoods and businesses can change drastically.

I already bought it, what now?

Just because you didn’t consider the view when you purchased the property—or if the view has changed over the years—doesn't mean you're out of luck. You can adjust the landscape to your advantage, planting trees to add greenery while blocking a regrettable view. Be careful with power lines and trees though, planting trees that will cross over powerlines can increase maintenance costs on the property and could get you into trouble with the city or utility provider. You can even offset the sounds railroad tracks and local businesses by swapping out your windows with ones that are more sound-insulating. Or try investing in sound-proofing paints which have the added benefit of being more temperature insulating as well.

Let your real estate professional know if you plan to resell the home on a tight schedule so they can help you find the best resale property in your market.





Posted by Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team on 2/20/2019

One of the most significant adjustments of your move to a new home will be getting to know your new community. You may have lived in your previous house for some time and have had a good relationship with your neighbors. From acquaintances to friends getting to know new people is not only a part of being a new kid at school. When you move into that new neighborhood, you and your family are the new kids on the block. So how do you get to know your neighbors and start getting comfortable in your community?

There’s No School Like the Old School.

You’ve probably seen movies where folks always pop by to visit a new addition to their neighborhood, welcoming them and possibly dropping off a plate of cookies or fudge. Believe it or not, people in a community honestly did do this at one point in time. Now there might be a tendency not to want to bother your neighbor or to feel standoff-ish from engaging a new person. When you settle into a new home, you might not get the welcome wagon you were secretly hoping for from your new neighbors. So, turn the tables and in a way, welcome yourself to the new neighborhood by welcoming them as part of your community. Is there a dish you make well? Brownies, pasta salad, casserole? Consider making a few mini dishes, take them around to your neighbors and introduce yourself. It is less likely that your neighbors are unfriendly than it is that they simply don’t know the best way to engage with you, so you’ll have to take the first step. Just saying hi and opening your door to them can help pave the way for greater engagement with your community, and even making long-term friends.

Find ways to engage.

Pay attention to opportunities to join the activity in your community. Have you noticed a dog walking group? Ask them whether you and your pup can join up. Visit the local community center to see if there are any leagues or clubs you can join. Find a softball team or book club or neighborhood watch group hosted by someone in your community. Start volunteering in the community garden or school fund drive. It will always take time to become comfortable in a new group, but your new city has just as many ways for you to engage as your last one did, all you have to do is look.

TIP: Do not use your children as a way to force friendships. A big move can be tough on your kids. Forcing playdates with kids whose parents you think you like may not be the best strategy for helping your kids fit into the new neighborhood. Instead, engage with those neighbors on your own time and find other opportunities for your kids to get involved in activities to help them discover their own friends. Sports leagues, community swimming pools, and parks are great ways for kids to play and casually explore new friendships. If they ask you for a playdate be wholly supportive, and who knows, maybe that kid’s parents are a perfect match for you too!

Throw a Party.

Are you used to playing the primary host for neighborhood events? Were you the go-to house for holidays, fundraisers and Sunday afternoon football? If you want to establish your home as a welcoming environment for your neighbors, you have to start hosting! After you've met your neighbors and have engaged with a few of them to learn some common interests, pick a hosting opportunity that includes the most people and start there. Maybe your new community is really into their dogs. Find a neighbor whose dog is having a birthday soon and offer to host it. Use it as an excuse to invite everyone over for doggy themed cocktails, picnic foods, and cute baked goods. Host a game night with a few of the new couples you’ve met and get the word out that your house is open every Tuesday night for tacos and games. Host a Sunday football viewing party that incorporates a BBQ and outdoor activities for kids. People from every walk of life and varied interests make up the fabric of our beloved communities, take a chance—put yourself out there to embrace your community and make new friends.

Whether you’re moving to a new suburb, condominium community or retirement living there are always social opportunities. Speak with your real estate agent about your lifestyle preferences to find the community that best allows you to engage.




Categories: Uncategorized  




Mark Consolmagno Michelle Curran Team
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